Bee-aware and Bee-wear! Why you should know about the “Plight of the honeybee”

Honey Bees have been a staple of suburban gardens for lifetimes on lifetimes, always buzzing around and never really bothering anyone until being bothered themselves. At this point in time, the honey bee is integral to the survival of our agricultural system, and they are slowly but surely dying off.

honeybee-honeycomb-macro_26201_990x742In a 2013 Time Magazine cover article titled “A World Without Bees” Journalist Bryan Walsh delved into the heart of the issues commonly referred to as the “Plight of the Honeybee”
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The first line of the feature read, “You can thank the Apis Mellifera, better known as the Western honeybee, for 1 in every 3 mouthfuls of food you’ll eat today.”

Yes the western honeybee is one of the most important animals in the production of the produce that we consume every single day.

Walsh added later, “Honeybees — which pollinate crops like apples, blueberries and cucumbers — are the “glue that holds our agricultural system together,” as the journalist Hannah Nordhaus put it in her 2011 book The Beekeeper’s Lament. (In fact, nearly 70% off all crops that are grown today require pollination.) But that glue is failing. Bee hives are dying off or disappearing thanks to a still-unsolved malady called colony collapse disorder (CCD), so much so that commercial beekeepers are being pushed out of the business.”

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CCD is based on multiple factors, most are cause by human influence, these are:

  • Pesticides that human’s spray on our crops.
  • Biological Threats like the Varroa mite are killing off colonies directly and spreading deadly diseases.
  • Over-production of commodity crops such as wheat and corn that provide no pollen for honey bees and therefore they are literally starving to death.

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The population decrease is so profound in some areas that places that were considered honey bee hotbeds like Iowa, has lost 70% of its population over 6 years. (from 2006-2012)

During that same time period, California, lost nearly half of its honey bee population. And from 2010-2015, the United States has lost 30% of its total honeybee population, and bee colonies are now no longer existent.

Canada is not immune to the problem either, but there are many great organizations fighting to save the bees, including Bees Are Life, which is based right in Toronto. We plan to team up with them in the near future.

Our Bee dress is meant to raise awareness around the plight of the honey bee and hopefully work towards changing it to a more hopeful, rebounding, and rising in population, flight of the honey bee.

Check out the beautiful dress below and pre order soon on our website.

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7 Ways to Repurpose Old Baby Items

reuse baby itemsWaste not, want not!

Just because your children are getting older doesn’t mean you have to toss out all those useful (and expensive!) baby items. An important part of living a healthy lifestyle means reducing your impact on the environment by limiting the number of new items you purchase. If it can safely be reused, you should find a way. Here are ways you can reuse old baby items.

1. Baby wipes container becomes an organizer.

Those plastic containers you’re always throwing out make perfect organizer boxes for all your little items, like makeup, hair accessories, art supplies, writing implements, sewing materials, and other odds and ends. Label their contents with a heavy marker and stack them easily in a closet or drawer.

2. Baby food jars become… baby food jars!

At some point you’ll buy those tiny baby food jars from the supermarket. If you ever make your own baby food, these jars (properly cleaned and sanitized, of course) are perfect containers. After pureeing your baby’s homemade food, refill the jars and store them in your refrigerator.

Baby food jars are also handy for spices and paints.

2. A baby’s crib becomes a toddler’s bed.

You can remove the front piece of the crib entirely or cut it down the middle (leaving room for your toddler to get in and out of the crib, but enough “fencing” to keep him or her from rolling out). This is a great way to transition your child into a big kid’s bed. They’ll adjust to a space they can get in and out of on their own, but it still feels familiar.

Click here for a detailed guide.

3. A changing table becomes a serving cart.

This will require some woodworking skills, but nothing you can’t learn on YouTube. By installing a heavy-duty set of wheels to one side of the piece, your multi-shelved changing table is the perfect way to serve food and drinks to your guests outdoors, or at a dinner party where there isn’t room to stock the table.

Click here for a detailed guide.

4. Baby socks become dusting rags.

Truthfully, you can turn any old piece of clothing into a rag, but baby socks are handy because you can slip them over your fingers or hands to quickly dust difficult areas, like bookcases full of items or the tops of cabinets. Once finished dusting, throw them in the wash with everything else.

5. The crib becomes a toddler’s desk.

By entirely removing the front section of the crib and mattress, you can create a toddler-height desk that’s perfect for arts and crafts, coloring and playing with table-top toys. Hang crafting equipment along the bars at the back and sides of the crib. Place one or two child-sized chairs in front of the desk. You could paint the surface of the desk a new color or let your kids draw whatever they like.

Click here for a detailed guide.

6. Send your baby clothes to a different family.

There’s never a reason to discard children’s clothing. Kids grow so quickly that buying everything new would put a tremendous burden on any family. Rather than throw away your child’s old clothes, bag them up and store them for your next child, or offer them to a family with new children of their own.

7. A diaper pail becomes a compost bin.

The diaper pail’s biggest benefit is that it contains odors. You can turn your old pail into a compost collector. Store organic and biodegradable materials within as part of your “go green” lifestyle.

organic baby toddler clothingWritten by Holly MacLean from Wee Urban

As a new mom, Holly was driven to start Wee Urban™ to offer the modern family a unique and fresh collection of eco-friendly baby gear and accessories that goes beyond the conventional and explores the exceptional! Tired of traditional pinks and blues and cute motifs, we offer sophisticated designs, “conscious” organic alternatives, practical functionality and superior quality. Using our custom certified organic cotton blends, low-impact dyes, and other trendsetting fabrics, we hope to inspire families to be make better choices and of course- do it all in urban style!

Beyond our organic cotton and azo-free dyes, Wee Urban uses 100% post-consumer packaging and tags for our Wee Dreams™ Sleep Bags. Our distinctive screen-printing is done with 100% eco-inks and are all phthalate free.

We also recycle our remnants and donate as much as possible to local elementary schools to help with arts and crafts programs.

For more information, visit wwww.weeurban.com

Interested in writing a guest blog for Wee Urban? Send your topic idea to tasha@socialmedia22.com

All data and information provided on this site is for informational purposes only. Wee Urban makes no representations as to accuracy, completeness, current-ness, suitability, or validity of any information on this site and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information, or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. All information is provided on an as-is basis.

Photo Credit: LizMarie_AK via Compfight cc

Be Kind to the Earth with 10 Ideas for Earth Day

how to celebrate earth dayNot only do we have to take care of mother Earth, but we have to protect her. On Earth Day, April 22, you can join together with us and help preserve the Earth. Earth Day was proposed by peace activist John McConnell to honor the Earth and the concept of peace. This is a great opportunity to teach our children the importance of preserving our environment. I am strong believer in the need to take care of our Earth. It doesn’t take much; every little difference helps. Use these ten ideas to celebrate Earth Day with your families.

1. Plant something

Most kids love getting dirty, so this is a great one! Whether it’s a seed, a flower or a tree, creating new life is always great for the environment. Once it grows you are left with either yummy food you grew yourself, or a beautiful flower to remind you that you did something great for the Earth.

2. Walk them to school

Walking not only saves you gas, but it decreases the amount of pollutants released into the air. Create a fun game to play on the walk, such as who can spot the most/coolest animals.

3. Make a poster

Make a poster that says “Happy Earth Day” and then have your kids decorate it. This will encourage conversations about the Earth and help your child to learn about how to preserve it. After it’s done, hang it on your front door. Not only will your child have had fun coloring, but your neighbors will be reminded that it is Earth Day.

4. Take pictures

Whip out the digital camera and have the kids go on a walk to find their favorite tree or garden, and then take a picture of it. Once you are back home, have a slideshow with the pictures. Ask the kids why they liked that spot so much, and explain to them how they could preserve it.

5. Decorate a recycling bin

Take your regular old recycling bin and let your children decorate it. While they are having fun painting trees and birds, inform them about the earth and why it is important to take care of it.

6. Visit the aquarium or zoo

Most aquariums or zoos have special Earth Day activities, so they can learn first-hand about the natural environment. Seeing the animals in person will remind them of why it’s important to protect them.

7. Donate

With the kids, go through your house and bag all of the things that your family no longer uses or wears. Once you’re done, take the bags to a local place that accepts donations. This teaches kids about reusing, recycling and giving.

8. Sing

There are many Earth songs on the internet that you and your children could sing along to. Even making up songs about why the earth is so special would be fun and informational.

9. Turn the lights off

Create a game where if someone forgets to turn the lights off when they leave a room, they owe $.25 to the Earth Day jar. This is a good way to teach them how preserving energy can help the environment.

10. Make Promises
Fill a chalkboard, or large paper, up with promises that you and your kids are going to make to the environment.

organic baby toddler clothingWritten by Holly MacLean from Wee Urban

As a new mom, Holly was driven to start Wee Urban™ to offer the modern family a unique and fresh collection of eco-friendly baby gear and accessories that goes beyond the conventional and explores the exceptional! Tired of traditional pinks and blues and cute motifs, we offer sophisticated designs, “conscious” organic alternatives, practical functionality and superior quality. Using our custom certified organic cotton blends, low-impact dyes, and other trendsetting fabrics, we hope to inspire families to be make better choices and of course- do it all in urban style!

Beyond our organic cotton and azo-free dyes, Wee Urban uses 100% post-consumer packaging and tags for our Wee Dreams™ Sleep Bags. Our distinctive screen-printing is done with 100% eco-inks and are all phthalate free.

We also recycle our remnants and donate as much as possible to local elementary schools to help with arts and crafts programs.

For more information, visit wwww.weeurban.com

Interested in writing a guest blog for Wee Urban? Send your topic idea to tasha@socialmedia22.com

All data and information provided on this site is for informational purposes only. Wee Urban makes no representations as to accuracy, completeness, current-ness, suitability, or validity of any information on this site and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information, or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. All information is provided on an as-is basis.

Photo Credit: FlyingSinger via Compfight cc