Summer Grubbin’ Happened So Fast

Here’s Wee Urban’s comprehensive and thoroughly researched, top 5 list of places to eat this summer in Toronto.

So whether you’re travelling to the big city, or living in it, chances are… you’ll love the places we list.

*2 of the 5 are outdoor patios*

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Harvest Kitchen

Harvest Kitchen is graced with two patios, one awning-covered, street-level space with room for 8 out front and the other, a 35-seat deck on the second-floor that’s surrounded by lush tree canopies. Snag a spot at brunch and indulge in pancakes and morning mimosas while soaking up the sun.

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The Porch

The patio above the Rock ‘N’ Horse Saloon benefits from sweeping views of the city including unobstructed photo ops of the CN Tower. At night, the rooftop lounge feels like a street party, but by day, the place is a casual hangout with a snack bar menu to enjoy alongside beers.

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Pi Co. 

BRAND NEW! Yorkville is now home to a quick-service pizza parlour. Pi Co. serves Neapolitan style pizza and allows you to pick your own toppings. The pizza is made in a brick fire oven, with the stones imported all the way from Italy. Pi Co. also serves up Sweet Pis for dessert, and a breakfast pizza.

20090628-stockyardssignThe Stockyards

The Stockyards is the modern day interpretation of the family diner/ BBQ joint while embracing traditional methods of dry curing, aging, and smoking that require time and patience. They also have Chicken & Waffles. Who doesn’t love Chicken & Waffles?

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Vesuvio

Toronto was first introduced to New York style pizza when the Pugliese family founded Vesuvio in 1957. This is by far, without a doubt, the best pizza the “6” has to offer. So if you’re travelling West, it’s a must-stop. Grab a large pepperoni, walk down High Park Av. into the park and enjoy a pizza themed picnic with the fam.

Mmm… I’m hungry!

Bee-aware and Bee-wear! Why you should know about the “Plight of the honeybee”

Honey Bees have been a staple of suburban gardens for lifetimes on lifetimes, always buzzing around and never really bothering anyone until being bothered themselves. At this point in time, the honey bee is integral to the survival of our agricultural system, and they are slowly but surely dying off.

honeybee-honeycomb-macro_26201_990x742In a 2013 Time Magazine cover article titled “A World Without Bees” Journalist Bryan Walsh delved into the heart of the issues commonly referred to as the “Plight of the Honeybee”
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The first line of the feature read, “You can thank the Apis Mellifera, better known as the Western honeybee, for 1 in every 3 mouthfuls of food you’ll eat today.”

Yes the western honeybee is one of the most important animals in the production of the produce that we consume every single day.

Walsh added later, “Honeybees — which pollinate crops like apples, blueberries and cucumbers — are the “glue that holds our agricultural system together,” as the journalist Hannah Nordhaus put it in her 2011 book The Beekeeper’s Lament. (In fact, nearly 70% off all crops that are grown today require pollination.) But that glue is failing. Bee hives are dying off or disappearing thanks to a still-unsolved malady called colony collapse disorder (CCD), so much so that commercial beekeepers are being pushed out of the business.”

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CCD is based on multiple factors, most are cause by human influence, these are:

  • Pesticides that human’s spray on our crops.
  • Biological Threats like the Varroa mite are killing off colonies directly and spreading deadly diseases.
  • Over-production of commodity crops such as wheat and corn that provide no pollen for honey bees and therefore they are literally starving to death.

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The population decrease is so profound in some areas that places that were considered honey bee hotbeds like Iowa, has lost 70% of its population over 6 years. (from 2006-2012)

During that same time period, California, lost nearly half of its honey bee population. And from 2010-2015, the United States has lost 30% of its total honeybee population, and bee colonies are now no longer existent.

Canada is not immune to the problem either, but there are many great organizations fighting to save the bees, including Bees Are Life, which is based right in Toronto. We plan to team up with them in the near future.

Our Bee dress is meant to raise awareness around the plight of the honey bee and hopefully work towards changing it to a more hopeful, rebounding, and rising in population, flight of the honey bee.

Check out the beautiful dress below and pre order soon on our website.

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6 Awesome Organic Recipes

I firmly believe that’s best to choose an organic option whenever you can – from our products to our food. When it comes to our meals, we only have to make a few adjustments to eat healthy. Here are some of my favorite organic recipes.

1. Organic Potato Crust Quiche (Gluten Free & Grain Free) Recipe

Organic Potato Crust Quiche

Perfect for lunch or brunch, these personal-sized quiches are easy to heat up quick when you’re in a rush. Like most quiches, you can easily change out the ingredients to suit your prefernces.

2. Smoothie Kit Creations

Smoothie Kit Creations

Admittedly, smoothies can take a lot of work. Their signature feature (the plethora of ingredients) can take time to prepare if you’re making just one smoothie. This isn’t so much of a recipe as it’s a “hack.” By portioning out your smoothie ingredients at one time, you reduce your labor and you’ll be more inclined to drink your fruits and vegetables each morning. Pretty clever!

3. Sweet Potato Casserole (Grain Free, Paleo, Primal)

Sweet Potato Casserole

Sweet potatoes are common around this part of the year. If you’re from a southern home in the States, they’re an absolute staple. This organic recipe combines a creamy inside with a crunchy pecan topping.

4. Almond Butter Brownies

Almond Butter Brownies

Almond butter is basically the consistency and flavor of regular butter without all the calories. These brownies are just as chewy and delicious as those made with traditional butter.

5. Italian Orzo Spinach Soup

Italian Orzo Spinach Soup

Made with organic ingredients, soup is the perfect meal this time of year. It warms your belly and you can keep a lot of it on hand for guests.

6. Organic Pumpkin Cheesecake

Organic Pumpkin Cheesecake

Who doesn’t love cheesecake? A thin slice of cheesecake is a great compliment to some of the heavy meals we eat this time of year. This recipe creamy and full of amazing texture, but it’s not so sweet that it’s tough to enjoy.

organic baby toddler clothingWritten by Holly MacLean from Wee Urban

As a new mom, Holly was driven to start Wee Urban™ to offer the modern family a unique and fresh collection of eco-friendly baby gear and accessories that goes beyond the conventional and explores the exceptional! Tired of traditional pinks and blues and cute motifs, we offer sophisticated designs, “conscious” organic alternatives, practical functionality and superior quality. Using our custom certified organic cotton blends, low-impact dyes, and other trendsetting fabrics, we hope to inspire families to be make better choices and of course- do it all in urban style!

Beyond our organic cotton and azo-free dyes, Wee Urban uses 100% post-consumer packaging and tags for our Wee Dreams™ Sleep Bags. Our distinctive screen-printing is done with 100% eco-inks and are all phthalate free.

We also recycle our remnants and donate as much as possible to local elementary schools to help with arts and crafts programs.

For more information, visit wwww.weeurban.com

Interested in writing a guest blog for Wee Urban? Send your topic idea to tasha@socialmedia22.com

All data and information provided on this site is for informational purposes only. Wee Urban makes no representations as to accuracy, completeness, current-ness, suitability, or validity of any information on this site and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information, or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. All information is provided on an as-is basis.

6 Ways to Teach Children About Germs

teach kids about germsGerms are everywhere. They’re out in the world and they’re even in our homes. They can be spread through fluids or simple contact. Children, especially, need to be careful about how they spread germs. Their immune systems are still immature and they have a tendency to touch just about everything; that’s why they seem to get sick so often. Here are some ways you can teach your kids about germs.

1. Practice what you preach.

I’ve said this before, but it’s worth repeating. Leading by example is the best way to teach our kids anything. We can insist they do as we say, not as we do, but that never works. If your children see you practicing good habits, they’ll naturally fall into step. Wash your hands before eating and after using the bathroom, blowing your nose, or coughing/sneezing into your hand.

2. Create a hand-washing song.

If you tell your kids to wash their hands, they’ll likely wet them under the water for a second and be done with it. But this doesn’t actually clean anything. Give them a fun way to measure the time by using a song that’s 15 to 20 seconds long. Encourage them to sing the song while they wash their hands and they aren’t done until the song is over. The ABCs usually take about 20 seconds.

3. Make food easily share-able.

While we want our kids to share, food should be off limits unless it’s been divided. Rather than letting them bite off that apple together, cut it into slices so they don’t pass germs to one another. Quarter that sandwich too. If you’ve only got one cup, drop in an extra straw.

4. Use a visual aid.

Often, kids are visual learners. Fill a spray bottle with water. Explain that in this example, the germs are the water. Give a spritz at a table or plant to show how far the germs can be spread. Keep spraying and stepping back until the water doesn’t reach the target anymore. This will give your kids an idea just how far germs can travel by coughs and sneezes.

5. Teach the basics of germs.

Explain that germs are tiny, impossible to see (with our eyes) little things that live basically everywhere. Many are harmless, but some can make us sick. They live out in the world and some even inside our bodies. If we touch something on the ground or public places, we could pick up germs. We can also get them if we touch other people if they forgot to wash their hands after sneezing, coughing or using the bathroom.

6. Use the wheat flour experiment.

This display is often used in kindergarten classes to explain germs. Cover a plate in whole wheat flour and tell the kids that it represents germs. Have a fraction of the group put their hands in the flour (one kid if you have two or three, two kids if you have four or five, three if you have ten, etc. so that just a few touch the flour). Then let them play with a communal toy like building blocks. After three or five minutes, have them all hold out their hands to see who has the “germs” now. Explain that had they washed their hands, no one would have the germs.

organic baby toddler clothingWritten by Holly MacLean from Wee Urban

As a new mom, Holly was driven to start Wee Urban™ to offer the modern family a unique and fresh collection of eco-friendly baby gear and accessories that goes beyond the conventional and explores the exceptional! Tired of traditional pinks and blues and cute motifs, we offer sophisticated designs, “conscious” organic alternatives, practical functionality and superior quality. Using our custom certified organic cotton blends, low-impact dyes, and other trendsetting fabrics, we hope to inspire families to be make better choices and of course- do it all in urban style!

Beyond our organic cotton and azo-free dyes, Wee Urban uses 100% post-consumer packaging and tags for our Wee Dreams™ Sleep Bags. Our distinctive screen-printing is done with 100% eco-inks and are all phthalate free.

We also recycle our remnants and donate as much as possible to local elementary schools to help with arts and crafts programs.

For more information, visit wwww.weeurban.com

Interested in writing a guest blog for Wee Urban? Send your topic idea to tasha@socialmedia22.com

All data and information provided on this site is for informational purposes only. Wee Urban makes no representations as to accuracy, completeness, current-ness, suitability, or validity of any information on this site and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information, or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. All information is provided on an as-is basis.